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Bad-Weather Driving


Dealing With the Elements

The term "joy ride" does not apply when it's pouring and the wind is gusting. The best strategy for driving in bad weather is to avoid it. But if going out is necessary or you get caught in bad conditions once you're already on the road, follow these safe driving tips:

BRRRRRRRaving the Snow and Ice

Driving a car is never "easy," but this is especially true in wintry weather. To hone your skills, ask someone with winter driving experience to take you to a vacant parking lot where you can practice driving, turning, and stopping in the snow.

If you must travel, keep your car gassed up so that the fuel lines don't freeze. Clear snow completely off the entire car (including the roof), remembering to sweep the taillights and headlights. Watch out for slow-moving vehicles like snowplows and sand trucks, and try not to get too close — the last thing you need in a snowstorm is a windshield full of sand. Also try to avoid passing these vehicles.

Put together a car emergency kit that contains:

If you get stranded, stay with your vehicle and call for assistance. Run the heater occasionally to keep warm, but avoid carbon monoxide poisoning by making sure your tailpipe isn't stuffed or blocked with snow or other debris.

Rainy Roads

Roads are dirty places. Between tires stirring up gravel and engines dripping oil and other fluids, a lot of oily and slick substances build up on roads. That's why roads are at their slickest almost immediately after it starts raining. The water brings those oils to the surface, making it sneaky-slick.

If you get caught in a slick situation and your car starts gliding or hydroplaning, don't panic or slam on the brakes. Keep a firm grip on the steering wheel, lift your foot off the accelerator, and let the vehicle coast (making sure not to turn the steering wheel) until you feel your vehicle get traction again.

To prevent hydroplaning:

Be aware of thunderstorm warnings. If a thunderstorm starts while you're driving and visibility is poor, pull over and wait it out. Don't run the risk of being struck by lightning — stay in your car and pull off the roadway into a parking lot if possible.

Scorching Sun and Fuzzy Fog

One of the most vital parts of driving is visibility. Both bright sun and soupy fog can cause limited visibility. To combat that pesky fireball in the sky, always have UV sunglasses somewhere in the car. Consider getting polarized sunglasses as they help reduce glare and improve visibility. Your car's pop-down visor can help reduce glare as well.

Fog can be a little trickier to handle than bright sunlight. Fog can reduce visibility to less than ¼ mile. Fog can also trick you into thinking you're going slower than you really are, so keep the speed down. When you can't see far ahead, it's hard to see brake lights or traffic signs until you're almost upon them. And just because you can't see doesn't mean that your high beams will improve visibility. In fact, high beams reduce visibility in fog. If your car has fog lights, use them. They'll help you see the edges of the road close to the car.

No matter what's causing the bad driving conditions, just remember: Don't venture out if you don't have to.

Reviewed by: Kurt E. Gray, MSM
Date reviewed: September 2016


Note: All information on TeensHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

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