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Bonding With Grandparents


If you've ever turned to your parents or your partner's parents for help and support with child-rearing, you know how wonderful grandparents can be. Although physical distance and parenting differences can come between grandparents, their kids, and their grandchildren, encouraging a close relationship can benefit everyone involved.

Bonding Benefits

Establishing a bond with grandparents is great for kids in many ways. Grandparents can be positive role models and influences, and they can provide a sense of cultural heritage and family history. Grandparents provide their grandkids with love, have their best interests at heart, and can make them feel safe.

Grandparents also encourage a child's healthy development. Overnight trips to Grandma's house, for example, may be less traumatic than sleepovers with peers and can help kids develop independence. Another benefit — grandparents may have lots of time to spend playing with and reading to kids. Such dedicated attention only improves a child's developmental and learning skills.

Tips for Staying in Touch

In today's world, though, families may be scattered across the country, and jam-packed school and work schedules may interfere with regular time with grandparents. Despite physical distance or busy schedules, you can encourage your kids to develop a closer bond with their grandparents.

Try these tips:

Safety Away From Home

Whether grandparents live nearby or you're planning to visit, don't forget to make safety a priority. Grandparents may not be used to having young kids in the house, and household dangers could mean trips to the emergency room.

Use a household safety checklist and work with the grandparents to childproof the home, making that dangerous items — such as cleaning products, medicines, razors, and knives — are out of reach or locked in a cabinet. Consider walking through the home with the grandparents to look for any potential safety hazards. They may not realize that small or breakable items are a choking or safety risk.

Taking these precautions ahead of time can free kids and grandparents to make the most of their special time together.

Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD
Date reviewed: January 2017


Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

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